APO-go® is indicated for the treatment of motor fluctuations ('ON-OFF' phenomena) in patients with Parkinson's disease which are not sufficiently controlled by oral anti-Parkinson medication.

APO-go® is a treatment for Parkinson's disease and its active constituent is apomorphine hydrochloride. It is marketed as APO-go® in the UK and other European countries. Other brand names for it are APOKYN or MOVAPO. 

APO-go® is available as APO-go® PEN, an intermittent injection, or APO-go® PUMP, a continuous subcutaneous infusion using a pre-filled syringe (PFS). 

Although derived from morphine, apomorphine has no opiate or direct pain-killing properties and is not a controlled drug. APO-go® is not a narcotic and is not addictive.

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